Review Blasts: May 2019 – part 2

Well, I promised myself I’d run TSNTW on my own terms, and that’s exactly what I’m going to do. And if that means I want to write two lots of short reviews in a month, then I’m going to write two lots of short reviews in a month. So, for this second installment, we have a live version of a classic from Entombed; righteous crust/hardcore from rising underground stars Redbait; Under A Full Moon’s anti-capitalist funeral doom; thrashing speed metal courtesy of Aggressive Perfector, who contain members of UK black metal upstarts Wode; and stirring, string-driven modern classical from duo Kamancello. Enjoy!

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Review: Vale – Burden of Sight

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Label: The Flenser

Considering that the band contains members of Ulthar, Abstracter, and Atrament, and that it’s being released by the mighty The Flenser label, expectations are inevitably raised for the debut album by Vale. Thankfully, Burden of Sight absolutely delivers, with its blackened crust onslaught possessing not only the rabid edge that helps characterise the genre, but also a slightly progressive aspect. Combined, it ensures that Vale are at the fore-front of this style – blackened crust has been lacking a real scene leader ever since Young And In The Way disbanded in the light of rape allegations, and in Vale, the scene may just have found one.

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Album of the Day recap – 08/10/18 -12/10/18

A delightfully mixed selection for this week’s Album of the Day recap, taking in indigenous black metal; blackgaze; old-school crust punk; powerviolence-infused anti-fascist hardcore; and mind-expanding psychedelic black metal. It’s possibly the most varied selection yet, which, considering the way that Album of the Day gleeful hops between genres, is quite something. Enjoy!

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Review: 偏執症者 (Paranoid) – Heavy Metal Fuck-Up!

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Label: The Sign Records

偏執症者 (Paranoid) have built up quite a reputation for themselves over the past few years, with their mix of Disclose-worshiping D-beat grit, Japanese hardcore madness, and heavy metal heroics seeming like a combination that is perhaps an obvious one; but it’s one that few, if any, other bands do quite so well. New album Heavy Metal Fuck-Up!, as its title implies, has a much more metallic edge to it than previous releases, but it’s still recognisable as 偏執症者 (Paranoid) through-and-through. Imagine a combination between early Sodom and Disclose (but with a halfway decent production), and you’re pretty much there; and Heavy Metal Fuck-Up! is every bit as violent, energising, and exciting as that implies. It’s hardly original; but that doesn’t stop it being bloody great.

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September 2018 Blasts

This edition of short reviews take in some very interesting stuff, including one of my favourite releases of the year (which is it? Read on to find out!). It also features a split that, though I find it flawed musically, I can’t help but want to emphasise how much I love it for what it tries to do, and how important it will be to some people. There’s a real mix of the underground and bigger names, with three of the six releases being put out without label support.

So, this month, we have melodic punk; crusty powerviolence; not-actually-war-metal; noise rock; thrash/heavy metal; goth-laced metal that all-but resurrects the spirit of Sister; and blissful blackgaze. Enjoy!

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Review: Arid – Scars of War

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Label: Self-released

The previous release from AridOfferings, was a punishing EP of “anti-fascist, anti-state, anti-human” crust, fueled by a righteous anger and sense of protest. It was a great release, that hinted at something very special to come. Now, following a shift in line-up and direction, the band return with Scars of War. Whilst you might expect such changes to potential undermine the momentum the band had previously displayed, Scars of War displays a band that are still possessed by the same sense of anti-fascist anger, determined to kick back against the growing tide of fascism, with these four songs (and Doom cover) being the soundtrack to protest marches and direct action.

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